SIMPLIFIER vs. COMPLIFIER

(2 mins read)

Picture: boradoodles.pl

Our life is becoming increasingly complex and overwhelming. The speed at which we live, technology, amount of information or activities, instead of slowing down, are accelerating every day. Every minute, we send 231,400,000 emails; we execute 5,900,000 searches on Google; we stream 1,000,000 hours; or we share 66,000 photos on Instagram. Every minute! The world we are living in is getting more and more complex and we need to find a way to navigate through the Ocean of Complexity.

Simplicity and clarity are the new GOLD!

If something is simple and clear, then we will be able to understand it.

There are two types of people we could consider in this aspect: “Complifier” and “Simplifier”.

A “Complifier” has a natural tendency to make any situation, process, task, or concept more complicated, confusing, or difficult to understand.

A “Simplifier”, on the other hand, has the ability to make something simpler, easier to understand, or less complex. Simplicity has a positive impact on problem-solving, communication, streamlining processes, concepts, or information.

The question is, which one are you?

Are you a COMPLIFIER or a SIMPLIFIER?

Now, take a piece of paper and check you past behaviors or experience with ten sentences below. First, let’s go through some signs that you may be a COMPLIFIER:

  1. You often find yourself in a situation where you lack structure or clarity.
  2. You tend to generate more questions than answers.
  3. You avoid making decisions.
  4. You enjoy long, unproductive discussions or meetings.
  5. You tend to create more problems than you solve.

On the other hand, here are some signs that you may be a problem SIMPLIFIER:

  1. You are well-organized and structured.
  2. You ask questions to understand.
  3. You enjoy making decisions.
  4. You are well prepared for every meeting.
  5. You are able to identify a single digit list of priorities.

If you have got more pluses in the second part of this short exercise, this is great. If you’ve identified yourself as a complifier, don’t worry. It’s never too late to change your mindset and become a simplifier.

Here are some tips to help you shift your perspective and to become a simplifier:

  1. ASK QUESTIONS TO UNDERSTAND
    Asking thoughtful questions is a powerful and straightforward way to deepen your understanding. By seeking clarity and gathering insights through inquiry, you can understand complex concepts or uncover new perspectives.
  2. BREAK DOWN AND ANALYZE
    Complex issues are like big elephants. How could we do it? It’s simple, by pieces. Breaking down and analyzing information into smaller topics allows you to understand complexities and to move on. 
  3. USE STORYTELLING
    One personal story is more powerful than a hundred slides. Sharing personal stories will help you to convert any problem or idea into clear narratives. When you present a complex problem or challenge in a narrative format, it will help other people to grasp and understand your message with greater clarity.
  4. TRUST YOUR LOGIC
    Trusting your logic will empower you to make decisions based on rational thinking and analyses. Rely on your ability to analyze facts and evidence and it will lead you to more informed choices and outcomes.
  5. FOLLOW YOUR HEART
    Embrace your inner desires, passions, and intuitions. Allow your heart to guide you through complexities and the unknown. It will help you to make decisions that align with your deeper knowledge.

Hopefully, it’s clear to you now that being a simplifier is not just a matter of talent or personality, but a choice and a habit. By adopting a positive and proactive mindset, staying curious and open-minded, taking action and experimenting, and collaborating and communicating effectively, you can become a simplifier and make a positive impact in your personal and professional life.

So, the next time you are faced with a complex situation or problem, ask yourself: “Am I a complifier or a simplifier?”

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